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Microsoft Windows Azure benefits at no charge

If you are an existing Visual Studio Professional, Premium or Ultimate with MSDN subscriber, you get free access to Windows Azure each month, and up to $3,700.00 in annual Windows Azure benefits at no charge….click here to learn more

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March 4, 2012 Posted by | Cloud Computing, Microsoft, Microsoft Azure, MSDN, Software | | 1 Comment

OAB…long time to download?

An offline address book (OAB) is a copy of a collection of address lists that has been downloaded so that a Microsoft Outlook user can access the information it contains while disconnected from the server. Microsoft Exchange generates the new OAB files, compresses the files, and then places the files on a local share. Exchange administrators can choose which address lists are made available to users who work offline, and they can also configure the method by which the address books are distributed.

Pretty straight forward explanation of OAB replication on Exchange 2010 SP2 Rollup Update…Thanks to Greg Taylor, Principal Program Manager @ Exchange Customer Experience, who explained on EHLO…click here to read more of this article

One important thing to share :

Important:
OAB data is produced by the Microsoft Exchange System Attendant service running as Local System. If an administrator uses the security descriptor to prevent users from viewing certain recipients in Active Directory, users who download the OAB will be able to view those hidden recipients. Therefore, to hide a recipient from an address list, you set the HiddenFromAddressListsEnabled parameter on the Set-PublicFolder, Set-MailContact, Set-MailUser, Set-DynamicDistributionGroup, Set-Mailbox, and Set-DistributionGroups cmdlets. Alternatively, you can create a new default OAB that doesn’t contain the hidden recipients.

Click here to understand more on offline Address Book

 

March 4, 2012 Posted by | Exchange server 2010, Mails, Microsoft, OAB, Office, Office 2010, Outlook | , , | Leave a comment

   

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