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Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 – At a glance

Before you install Microsoft Exchange Server 2013, we recommend that you review this topic to ensure that your network, hardware, software, clients, and other elements meet the requirements for Exchange 2013. Exchange Server 2013 RTM to the public release is as part of the planned release of Office 2013 products.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 enables you to maintain control, increase user productivity, and keep your organization safe:

  • Remain in control, online and on-premises. Exchange Server 2013 enables you to tailor your solution based on your unique needs and ensures your communications are always available while you remain in control, on your own terms – online, on-premises, or a hybrid of the two.
  • Do more, on any device. Exchange Server 2013 helps your users be more productive by helping them manage increasing volumes of communications across multiple devices and work together more effectively as teams.
  • Keep your organization safe. Exchange Server 2013 keeps your organization safe by enabling you to protect business communications and sensitive information to meet internal and regulatory compliance requirements.
  • Available in these languages: Arabic, English, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil), Russian, Spanish
  • Available in these editions: 64-bit

Understanding the coexistence scenarios that are supported for Exchange 2013 and earlier versions of Exchange

  • Exchange Server 2003 and earlier versions: Not supported
  • Exchange 2007: Supported (Requires Exchange 2007 Service Pack 3 (SP3) and an update rollup, to be released at a later date, on all Exchange 2007 servers in the organization, including Edge Transport servers.)
  • Exchange 2010: Supported (Requires Exchange 2010 SP3 (to be released at a later date) on all Exchange 2010 servers in the organization, including Edge Transport servers.)
  • Mixed Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2007 organization: Supported (Requires Exchange 2007 SP3 and an update rollup, to be released at a later date, on all Exchange 2007 servers in the organization, including Edge Transport servers. Also requires Exchange 2010 SP3 (to be released at a later date) on all Exchange 2010 servers in the organization, including Edge Transport servers.)
  • Hybrid Deployment: Exchange 2013 supports hybrid deployments with Office 365 tenants that have been upgrade to the latest version of Office 365.

Lists the requirements for the network and the directory servers in your Exchange 2013 organization.

Schema master: the schema master runs on the first Windows Server 2012 or Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2003 domain controller installed in a forest. The schema master must be running any of the following:

  • Windows Server 2012 Standard or Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard or Enterprise
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter RTM or later
  • Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter RTM or later
  • Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 2 (SP2) or later (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition with SP2 or later (32-bit or 64-bit)

Global catalog server: In each Active Directory site where you plan to install Exchange 2013, you must have at least one global catalog server running any of the following:

  • Windows Server 2012 Standard or Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard or Enterprise
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter RTM or later
  • Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter RTM or later
  • Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 2 (SP2) or later (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition with SP2 or later (32-bit or 64-bit)

Domain controller: In each Active Directory site where you plan to install Exchange 2013, you must have at least one writeable domain controller running any of the following:

  • Windows Server 2012 Standard or Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard or Enterprise SP1 or later
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter RTM or later
  • Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise SP1 or later (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter RTM or later
  • Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 2 (SP2) or later (32-bit or 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition with SP2 or later (32-bit or 64-bit)

Active Directory forest: Active Directory must be at Windows Server 2003 forest functionality mode or higher.

The Active Directory driver: Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 uses Active Directory to store and share directory information with Windows. Active Directory forest design for Exchange 2013 is similar to Exchange Server 2010, except in a few ways, which is The Active Directory driver, the core Microsoft Exchange component that allows Exchange services to create, modify, delete, and query for Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) data. In Exchange 2013, all access to Active Directory is done using the Active Directory driver itself. Previously, in Exchange 2010, DSAccess provided directory lookup services for components such as SMTP, message transfer agent (MTA), and the Exchange store. The Active Directory driver also uses Microsoft Exchange Active Directory Topology (MSExchangeADTopology), which allows the Active Directory driver to use Directory Service Access (DSAccess) topology data. This data includes the list of available domain controllers and global catalog servers available to handle Exchange requests.

IPv6 Support: In Exchange 2013, IPv6 is fully supported, but only when IPv4 is also installed. You can disable IPv4 so only IPv6 is enabled, but uninstalling IPv4 isn’t supported. If Exchange 2013 is deployed in this configuration, all Exchange servers can send data to and receive data from devices, servers, and clients that use IPv6 addresses.

Micrososft don’t support the installation of Exchange 2013 on a computer that’s running in Windows Server Core mode. The computer must be running the full installation of Windows Server. If you want to install Exchange 2013 on a computer that’s running in Windows Server Core mode, you must convert the server to a full installation of Windows Server by doing one of the following:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2   Reinstall Windows Server and select the Full Installation option.
  • Windows Server 2012   Convert your Windows Server Core mode server to a full installation by running the following command.  Install-WindowsFeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra, Server-Gui-Shell -Restart

Supporting Client: Exchange 2013 supports the following minimum versions of Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Entourage for Mac:

  • Outlook 2013
  • Outlook 2010 SP1 with April 2012 Cumulative Update
  • Outlook 2007 SP3 with July 2012 Cumulative Update
  • Entourage 2008 for Mac, Web Services Edition
  • Outlook  for Mac 2011

What do you need to know before you begin?

  • Estimated time to complete: 60 minutes
  • Make sure you’ve read the release notes prior to installing Exchange 2013.  Release Notes for Exchange 2013.
  • Each organization requires at a minimum one Client Access server and one Mailbox server in the Active Directory forest. Exchange 2013 doesn’t require you to deploy a Client Access server in each Active Directory site containing a Mailbox server. For example, you can deploy Mailbox servers to non-Internet-facing sites and then proxy communications to those Mailbox servers from Client Access servers in Internet-facing sites. If you’re separating your server roles, we recommend installing the Mailbox server role first.
  • The computer you install Exchange 2013 on must have a supported operating system (such as Windows Server 2008 R2 with Service Pack 1 (SP1) or Windows Server 2012), have enough disk space, be a member of an Active Directory domain, and satisfy other requirements.  Exchange 2013 System Requirements.
  • To run Exchange 2013 setup, you must install Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5, Windows Management Framework 3.0, and other required software. To understand the prerequisites for all server roles, see Exchange 2013 Prerequisites.
  • You must ensure the account you use is delegated membership in the Schema Admins group if you haven’t previously prepared the Active Directory schema. If you’re installing the first Exchange 2013 server in the organization, the account you use must have membership in the Enterprise Admins group. If you’ve already prepared the schema and aren’t installing the first Exchange 2013 server in the organization, the account you use must be a member of the Exchange 2013 Organization Management role group. Administrators who are members of the Delegated Setup role group can deploy Exchange 2013 servers that have been previously provisioned by a member of the Organization Management role group.
  • For information about keyboard shortcuts , see Keyboard Shortcuts in Exchange 2013.

Download Microsoft Exchange Server 2013, Click here

NOTES:

  • After you install any server roles on a computer running Exchange 2013, you can’t use the Exchange 2013 Setup wizard to add any additional server roles to this computer. If you want to add more server roles to a computer, you must either use Add or Remove Programs from Control Panel or use Setup.exe from a Command Prompt window.
  • After you install Exchange 2013 on a server, you must not change the server name. Renaming a server after you have installed an Exchange 2013 server role is not supported.
  • If you have User Access Control (UAC) enabled, you must right-click Setup.exe and select Run as administrator.
  • The organization name can’t contain more than 64 characters. The organization name can’t be blank.
  • Pre-requisites option installs only the Windows features required by Exchange. You must manually install other prerequisites manually. For more information, see Exchange 2013 Prerequisites.

Exchange Server 2013 comes with a number of new features as well as improvements on existing features that are already familiar to those who have worked with Exchange Server 2010.

List as follows:

  • Server roles to just two; Client Access server and Mailbox server
  • New Outlook 2013 and Outlook Web App user interfaces, and offline access for OWA
  • No more Exchange Management Console, all administration is now performed using the new web-based Exchange Administration Center , Exchange Management Shell (using PowerShell 3.0)
  • Improvements to high availability features and manageability
  • Public folders are now stored in mailbox databases and can take advantage of Database Availability Groups for replication and high availability
  • Data loss prevention capabilities that can be integrated into Transport Rules

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Exchange server 2013, Mails, Microsoft, Server Roles, Software | , , | Leave a comment

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 – Mail flow

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013, mail flow occurs through the transport pipeline. The transport pipeline is a collection of services, connections, components, and queues that work together to route all messages to the categorizer in the Transport service on a Mailbox server inside the organization.

The transport pipeline consists of the following services:

  • Front End Transport service   This service runs on all Client Access servers and acts as a stateless proxy for all inbound and outbound external SMTP traffic for the Exchange 2013 organization. The Front End Transport service doesn’t inspect message content, but it can filter messages based on connections, domains, senders, and recipients. The Front End Transport service only communicates with the Transport service on a Mailbox server, and doesn’t queue any messages locally.
  • Transport service   This service runs on all Mailbox servers and is virtually identical to the Hub Transport server role in previous versions of Exchange. The Transport service handles all SMTP mail flow for the organization, performs message categorization, and performs message content inspection. Unlike previous versions of Exchange, the Transport service never communicates directly with mailbox databases. That task is now handled by the Mailbox Transport service. The Transport service routes messages between the Mailbox Transport service, the Transport service, and the Front End Transport service.
  • Mailbox Transport service   This service runs on all Mailbox servers and consists of two separate services: the Mailbox Transport Submission service and Mailbox Transport Delivery service. The Mailbox Transport Delivery service receives SMTP messages from the Transport service on the local Mailbox server or on other Mailbox servers, and connects to the local mailbox database using an Exchange remote procedure call (RPC) to deliver the message. The Mailbox Transport Submission service connects to the local mailbox database using RPC to retrieve messages, and submits the messages over SMTP to the Transport service on the local Mailbox server, or on other Mailbox servers. The Mailbox Transport Submission service has access to the same routing topology information as the Transport service. Like the Front End Transport service, the Mailbox Transport service also doesn’t queue any messages locally.

Messages from outside the organization enter the transport pipeline through a Receive connector in the Front End Transport service on a Client Access server and are then routed to the Transport service on a Mailbox server.

Messages inside the organization enter the Transport service on a Mailbox server in one of the following ways:

  • Through a Receive connector.
  • From the Pickup directory or the Replay directory.
  • From the Mailbox Transport service.
  • Through agent submission.

The following figure shows the relationships among the components in the Exchange 2013 transport pipeline.

Transport pipeline overview diagram

Every message that’s sent or received in an Exchange 2013 organization must be categorized in the Transport service on a Mailbox server before it can be routed and delivered. After a message has been categorized, it’s put in a delivery queue for delivery to the destination mailbox database, the destination database availability group (DAG), Active Directory site, or Active Directory forest, or to the destination domain outside the organization.

The Transport service on a Mailbox server consists of the following components and processes:

    • SMTP Receive   When messages are received by the Transport service, message content inspection is performed, transport rules are applied, and anti-spam and anti-malware inspection is performed if they are enabled. The SMTP session has a series of events that work together in a specific order to validate the contents of a message before it’s accepted. After a message has passed completely through SMTP Receive and isn’t rejected by receive events, or by an anti-spam and anti-malware agent, it’s put in the Submission queue.
    • Submission   Submission is the process of putting messages into the Submission queue. The categorizer picks up one message at a time for categorization. Submission happens in three ways:
      • Through an SMTP Receive connector.
      • Through the Pickup directory or the Replay directory. These directories exist on the Mailbox server. Correctly formatted message files that are copied into the Pickup directory or the Replay directory are put directly into the Submission queue.
      • Through a transport agent.
    • Categorizer   The categorizer picks up one message at a time from the Submission queue. The categorizer completes the following steps:
      • Recipient resolution, which includes top-level addressing, expansion, and bifurcation.
      • Routing resolution.
      • Content conversion.

      Additionally, mail flow rules that are defined by the organization are applied. After messages have been categorized, they’re put into a delivery queue that’s based on the destination of the message. Messages are queued by the destination mailbox database, DAG, Active Directory site, Active Directory forest or external domain.

    • SMTP Send   How messages are routed from the Transport service depends on the location of the message recipients relative to the Mailbox server where categorization occurred. The message could be routed to the Mailbox Transport service on the same Mailbox server, the Mailbox Transport service on a different Mailbox server that’s part of the same DAG, the Transport service on a Mailbox server in a different DAG, Active Directory site, or Active Directory forest, or to the Front End Transport service on a Client Access server for delivery to the Internet.

Message Size Limits..Click here to know more

Configure Mail Flow and Client Access…Click here to know more

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Exchange Online, Exchange server 2013, Mails, Microsoft, Software | , | Leave a comment

Microsoft Exchange Connectivity Analyzer Tool – Client

The Microsoft Connectivity Analyzer Tool is a downloadable client program that is used to identify connectivity issues that occur between email clients and a server that is running Microsoft Exchange Server. The tool can also be used to identify connectivity issues between email clients and Office 365. The tool can be used both by email users, to identify common problems, and by IT Administrators, to troubleshoot issues that are affecting their Exchange Server deployments.

The Microsoft Connectivity Analyzer Tool simulates several client logon and mail flow scenarios. When a test fails, many of the errors message provide troubleshooting tips to help the user or IT Administrator to resolve the problem.

This tool is a companion tool to the Remote Connectivity Analyzer website. Whereas the Remote Connectivity Analyzer website enables IT Administrators to pinpoint connectivity issues by simulating connectivity from a location outside the customer environment, the Microsoft Connectivity Analyzer Tool lets both email users and IT administrators run the same tests within the user’s environment.

You must be running one of the following operating systems:

  • Windows 8
  • Windows 7
  • Windows Server 2008
  • 64-bit edition of Windows Vista

Download the client tool (Microsoft Connectivity Analyzer (Beta) here.

Connectivity check as follows

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a01

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Select one of the option below to continue to next screen

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Enter the credential you want to check for connectivity issues

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Enjoy!!

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Exchange server 2010, Mails, Microsoft, Office 2010, Office 365, Outlook, Outlook Webapps, OWA, Phone, Protocols, Remote Connectivity Analyzer, Software | , , , | 1 Comment

Exchange server 2013 – Publishing rule using TMG

Now that Exchange Server 2013 is available, some of you may well be wondering how to publish it to the Internet using Microsoft Threat Management Gateway (TMG) or perhaps the Microsoft Unified Access Gateway (UAG).

The first thing to know is that there is no Exchange Server 2013 publishing wizard, but do not panic as you can instead use the 2010 wizard, and then make some changes described here…Read the blog article from exchange team blog

November 27, 2012 Posted by | Exchange server 2013, Mails, Microsoft, Software, Threat Management Gateway | , , | Leave a comment

Sky Drive – All you need to know!!!

If you have a Windows Live account (or an old Hotmail account), then you have 25GB of free storage on SkyDrive. If you don’t have one, go and grap it. SkyDrive is a great way to store lots of files in the cloud for easy access remotely. Windows 7  and now defenetely on windows 8 will let you map your SkyDrive folders as network drives, making access even simpler.

How to map SkyDrive to your computer?

Windows 7 will let you map your SkyDrive to your local machine. How to do it? Here is the step

  • Sign in to your Windows Live account.
  • Get your ID from the address bar (Below showing how to get it)
    • Click on the “Files” as shown below

    • Look at the address bar and you will find your “CID” number just copy that number
  • Now go to your Windows 7 computer
  • Open My Computer, then select “Map network drive” near the top bar.
  • Select the drive letter you want, then type the following  under the “Folder bar”
  • \\docs.live.net@SSL\ and then copy your CID number here \
  • Check mark “Reconnect at logon”
  • Click Finish
  • Once you click finish, system will automatically attempt to log on to your SkyDrive.
  • Next system will show you to enter SkyDrive credential.
  • Enter the username and password and clik PK

Thats it..your SkyDrive is now mapped to your local machine.

Here you can rename the folder (If in case the language is not proper in you SkyDrive). What ever you do at the local “mapped” Skydrive, it will reflect in your SkyDrive as well.

Apps for SkyDrive?

Allmost all the device now support SkyDrive and it is free apps..you just name it..Windows, Mac, Windows Phone, iPhone, iPad…Click here to download it

Read the article from Mike Torres, and Omar Shahine, group program managers for SkyDrive.

Enjoy!!!

 

 

 

April 24, 2012 Posted by | Apple, Hotmail, HTML 5, iPhone, Mails, Microsoft, Office, Office 2010, Office 365, Personnel, Phone, SkyDrive, Software, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows phone | , , , , | Leave a comment

SkyDrive from Microsoft – Delivering new capabilities

Mike Torres, Oman Shahine and skydrive team did a wonderful job. Read this post

April 24, 2012 Posted by | Apple, Mails, Microsoft, Personnel, Phone, SkyDrive, Software, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Live, Windows phone | | Leave a comment

Import contacts into Outlook from Excel

Exporting from Excel

  1. If row 1 of your spreadsheet contains column descriptions, such as “Name,” “E-mail Address,” and so on, skip to step 3. If it does not, add one that does by right-clicking the 1 to the left of the first row, and then clicking Insert.
  2. In the new blank cells at the top of each column, type a description for that column, such as “Name,” “E-mail Address,” “Company,” “Phone Number,” and so on.
  3. On the File menu, click Save As.
  4. Choose a folder to save to from the Save in drop-down list, type a name for the file, such as “Contacts,” in the File name box, and in the Save as type drop-down list, click CSV (Comma delimited).
  5. Make a note of the folder location, and then click SAVE.

Importing into Outlook (older versions)

  1. If you are importing into an existing Contacts folder, skip to step 3. To create a new folder in Outlook, click Folder List on the View menu, unless the Folder List is open already.
  2. Right-click the Contacts folder, and then click New Folder, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.
  3. On the File menu, click Import and Export, click Next, click Comma Separated Values (Windows), and then click Next.
  4. If the file that is displayed is not the correct file, click Browse, browse to the folder noted in step 3, and then double-click the file to select it.
  5. If you are importing into a new folder, the Options settings is irrelevant because there are no duplicates. If not, choose the most logical selection. Click Allow duplicates if you are not sure, and then click Next.
  6. Click the Contacts folder, or other contacts-type folder that you have created, to import into, and then click Next.
  7. If you are not sure that the column names in the first row of the spreadsheet will map correctly to the Outlook fields, click Map custom fields to verify them.

    NOTE: If Map custom fields is unavailable, you have chosen a non-contact-type folder to import into. Click Back, and then choose the correct folder. If you are satisfied with the mapping, click OK to close the Map Custom Fields dialog box, and then click Finish.

Importing into Outlook 2010

  1. If you are importing into an existing Contacts folder, skip to step 4.
  2. Create a new folder in Outlook 2010
  3. Right-click the Contacts folder, click New Folder, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.
  4. Click the File tab in the Ribbon, and then click Open on the menu.
  5. Click on Import tab. The Import and Export Wizard opens.
  6. If the file that is displayed is not the correct file, click Browse , browse to the folder that is mentioned in step 3, and then double-click the file to select it.
  7. If you are importing into a new folder, the Options settings are irrelevant because there are no duplicates. If you are not importing to a new folder, choose the most logical selection. Click Allow duplicates if you are not sure, and then click Next .
  8. Click the Contacts folder or another contacts-type folder that you have created, and then click Next.
  9. If you are not sure that the column names in the first row of the spreadsheet will map correctly to the Outlook fields, click Map custom fields to verify them.

April 19, 2012 Posted by | Mails, Microsoft, Office, Office 2010, Office 365, Outlook, Outlook Webapps, Software | | Leave a comment

Attachments not showing in Microsoft Outlook

Interesting topic

ISSUE: When an user sends email with  attachment Microsoft Outlook clients don’t see paperclip nor attachment but the size of the mail shows there is more then just text. The attachment is visible in OWA. When forwarding the message from OWA the attachment shows up in outlook.

FINDINGS: I think the issue related to misformed MIME. The content type of the email is not correct; it is multipart/related, and should be multipart/mixed.

  • It may or may not be an issue on your end, incorrectly formatted mime messages sent by the sender can cause it not to render correctly in Outlook.
  • Things like the sender running third party apps such as disclaimers can mess up the mime formatting.
  • RFC 2387 describes the intended use of multipart/related:
    • “The Multipart/Related media type is intended for compound objects consisting of several inter-related body parts. For a Multipart/Related object, proper display cannot be achieved by individually displaying the constituent body parts.”
    • Exchange handles multipart/related specially – i.e. it considers all attachment parts inside multipart/related as “inline”. Such attachments are normally hidden from the attachment list and supposed to be accessible from the body itself, like inline images. Some clients, like OWA, can determine whether attachments are really “inline” by analyzing a message body – if they don’t find any reference to such attachment in a body they fix it by displaying it in attachment list. Other clients like Outlook will trust how attachments are marked by Exchange and hide them.
  • A “correct” way to structure message would look like this:
    • Multipart/mixed
    • Multipart/related
    • Text/html – message body
    • Any inline attachments referenced from the body
    • Any normal attachments, like application/msword

 SUGGESTION: Add a Transport Rule to simply “force” us to use multipart/mixed (Only when the mail is coming from the specific domain) and that will make the attachment visible in Outlook.

SOLUTION: Launch Exchange Management Console

  • Expand Organization Configuration
  • Select Hub Transport
  • On the right-hand Action Pane, select New Transport Rule …
  • Give the rule a name
  • Select when the From Address contains Specific Word click the highlighted “Specific words”, Type “contoso.com”
  • click Add, click OK, and then click Next
  • Select “set header with value,” click the highlighted “header” text, type
  • Content-Type, click OK
  • Click the highlighted “value” text, type multipart/mixed, click OK, and then click
  • Next
  • On the “Exceptions” page, simply click next
  • At the final “Create Rule” page
  • Click New, and then click Finish

April 12, 2012 Posted by | Exchange Management Console, Exchange Server 2007, Exchange server 2010, Mails, Microsoft, Office, Outlook, Software | , , | Leave a comment

OAB…long time to download?

An offline address book (OAB) is a copy of a collection of address lists that has been downloaded so that a Microsoft Outlook user can access the information it contains while disconnected from the server. Microsoft Exchange generates the new OAB files, compresses the files, and then places the files on a local share. Exchange administrators can choose which address lists are made available to users who work offline, and they can also configure the method by which the address books are distributed.

Pretty straight forward explanation of OAB replication on Exchange 2010 SP2 Rollup Update…Thanks to Greg Taylor, Principal Program Manager @ Exchange Customer Experience, who explained on EHLO…click here to read more of this article

One important thing to share :

Important:
OAB data is produced by the Microsoft Exchange System Attendant service running as Local System. If an administrator uses the security descriptor to prevent users from viewing certain recipients in Active Directory, users who download the OAB will be able to view those hidden recipients. Therefore, to hide a recipient from an address list, you set the HiddenFromAddressListsEnabled parameter on the Set-PublicFolder, Set-MailContact, Set-MailUser, Set-DynamicDistributionGroup, Set-Mailbox, and Set-DistributionGroups cmdlets. Alternatively, you can create a new default OAB that doesn’t contain the hidden recipients.

Click here to understand more on offline Address Book

 

March 4, 2012 Posted by | Exchange server 2010, Mails, Microsoft, OAB, Office, Office 2010, Outlook | , , | Leave a comment

PST Capture Tool – We ask, Microsoft Exchange team delivers it!!!

EHLO, our Exchange Halo team!!! always listening for feedback on what we’re doing well and delivers the tool best for us. As more and more of us evaluate and deploy the email archiving, retention and discovery capabilities of Exchange Server 2010 and Exchange Online, we understand that Personal Folders (.pst files) remain a challenge for us. The ability to search our network to discover and then import .pst files across your environment is critical, and that you need an admin-driven and straightforward tool for doing these things….here comes the EHLO.. In July 2011, Exchange team announce that later this year they will  be adding a new tool to our already rich portfolio of planning and deployment tools. This new tool, PST Capture, will be downloadable and free, and will enable you to discover .pst files on your network and then import them into both Exchange Online (in Office 365) and Exchange Server 2010 on-premises.

And now the EHLO action…..!!!!

PST Capture tool helps us search your network to discover and then import .pst files across your environment – all from a straightforward admin-driven tool. PST Capture will help reduce risk while increasing productivity for your users by importing .pst files into Exchange Online or Exchange Server 2010 – directly into users’ primary mailboxes or archives.

PST Capture documentation, Click here

To download PST Capture (Microsoft Exchange PST Capture is used to discover and import .pst files into Exchange Server or Exchange Online), click here

System requirements – Supported Operating Systems: Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise

  • Review the Technical Documentation prior to installation of Microsoft Exchange PST Capture
  • Exchange Server 2010, if used to import to Exchange Server 2010 mailboxes or archives
  • Exchange Online (Office 365) subscription if used to import to Exchange Online (Office 365) mailboxes or archives
  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 or 3.5 Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Microsoft Outlook 2010 x64 (only required on the host computer where you install the Central Service and Console)

Thank you Microsoft Exchange Team!!!!

January 31, 2012 Posted by | Cloud Computing, Exchange Online, Exchange server 2010, Mails, Microsoft, Office, Office 365, Outlook, Software | , , , | Leave a comment

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