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Network Camera – Installation tips

What is IP-Surveillance? IP-Surveillance is a term for a security system that gives users the ability to monitor and record video and/or audio over an IP (Internet Protocol-based) computer network such as a local area network (LAN) or the Internet. In a simple IP-Surveillance system, this involves the use of a network camera (or an analog camera with a video encoder/video server), a network switch, a PC for viewing, managing and storing video, and video management software.

Indoor or outdoor. Outdoor network cameras must have an auto iris lens to regulate how much light is received. Many outdoor cameras require a protective housing. Others may already be designed with a protective enclosure. Housings are also available for indoor cameras that require protection from harsh environments such as dust and humidity, and from vandalism or tampering. A network camera with built-in wireless support is a consideration when running a cable between a LAN and a network camera is impractical, difficult or expensive. Wireless network cameras are suitable for use in outdoor situations, in environments such as historic buildings where the installation of cables would damage the interior, or in cases where there is a need to move cameras to new locations on a regular basis, such as in a supermarket. Ensure that the wireless network camera supports security protocols such as IEEE 802.1X and WPA/WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access), which will help secure the wireless communication.

A megapixel network camera (i.e. one that delivers an image comprised of 1 million or more pixels) can also offer resolutions greater than what an analog camera can offer, which means that more detail or larger areas can be covered. High image quality is essential in a security surveillance application. You want to be able to clearly capture an incident in progress and identify persons or objects involved. In a network video system, the quality of images produced can be more easily retained than in an analog surveillance system. A network camera that uses progressive scan technology provides clearer images of moving objects because the whole image is presented at one time. With an analog video signal, two consecutive interlaced fields of lines are presented to form an image, and when displayed on a PC monitor, blurriness occurs when objects move between the image capture of the two interlaced fields.

PoE enables networked devices to receive power from a PoE-enabled switch or midspan through the same standard cable that transmits data (video). Power over Ethernet (PoE) (IEEE 802.3af) When a network camera supports this feature, it means that the camera can receive power through the same cable as for data. Hiring a certified electrician and installing a separate power line are not needed—a big advantage, particularly in difficult-to-reach areas. With PoE, network cameras/video encoders will also be able to receive centralized backup power from a server room with an Uninterruptible Power Supply; so in the event of a power failure, the cameras/video encoders will still be able to operate.

Network management features: They include support for Quality of Service (QoS), which can prioritize and reserve network capacity for mission-critical surveillance in a QoS aware network, and support for Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) in addition to IPv4 addresses. Network switches allow devices such as network cameras, servers and PCs to communicate with each other to share information and, in some cases, a common Internet connection. Network designs can take many forms and may vary in terms of performance and security. First, determine what your company is using the network for and how congested your local area network (LAN) or wide area network (WAN) is. If you are implementing a smaller surveillance system involving 8 to 10 cameras, you should be able to use a basic 100-megabit (Mbit) network switch (Now a days gigabit switches are more cheaper to buy) without having to consider bandwidth limitations. With more than 12 to 15 cameras, you should consider using a switch with a gigabit (Gbit) backbone. If a gigabit-supporting switch is used, the server that runs the video management software should have a gigabit network adapter installed on the running machine. When running wireless camera, make sure the AP supports gigabit, inorder to avoid slow frames.

Remote accessibility: You can access live and recorded video at any time and from virtually any networked location in the world. Multiple, authorized users at different locations may be able to access live or recorded video. This is advantageous if your company wants a third-party, such as a security firm, to benefit from and have access to the video.

Hardware (server, softwareand storage): The hardware requirements of an IP-Surveillance system are not complex. Simply use standard components found in the IT industry. Today’s PC, with a Pentium processor and Windows operating system, is able to run a video management software, and record and store video from up to 50 cameras. If the hard disk on the actual server running the recording application is not enough, there are solutions that enable you to increase storage space and achieve increased flexibility and recoverability. As larger hard drives are produced at lower costs, it is becoming less expensive to store large amounts of video. A wide range of software is available to help you in the preparation, installation and management of an IP-Surveillance system Eg: Axis Camera Management, if you buy Axis cameras, Video Insight etc.

H.264 Storeage calculation:

  • Bit rate / 8(bits in a byte) x 3600s = Kilobyte (KB) per hour / 1000 = Megabyte (MB) per hour
  • MB per hour x hours of operation per day / 1000 = Gigabyte (GB) per day
  • GB per day x requested period of storage = Storage need

MPEG-4 calculation:

  • Bit rate / 8(bits in a byte) x 3600s = KB per hour / 1000 = MB per hour
  • MB per hour x hours of operation per day / 1000 = GB per day
  • GB per day x requested period of storage = Storage need

Motion JPEG calculation:

  • Image size x frames per second x 3600s = KB per hour/1000 = MB per hour
  • MB per hour x hours of operation per day / 1000 = GB per day
  • GB per day x requested period of storage = Storage need

Legal considerations: Video surveillance can be restricted or prohibited by laws that vary from country to country. It is advisable to check the laws in your local region before installing a video surveillance system. You may need to register or get a license from an authority to conduct video surveillance, particularly in public areas. You may have to place signs to warn the public that they are entering a zone covered by surveillance equipment and there may be rules regarding the signage. Video recordings, for instance, may be required to have time and date stamped.

PTZ network cameras: The camera’s view can be remotely controlled, either manually or automatically, for panning from side to side, tilting up and down, and zooming in and out of an area or object. There are now mechanical as well as non-mechanical PTZ cameras.

Automatic day/night functionality: This feature is incorporated into some outdoor cameras and enables the automatic removal of the infrared (IR) cut filter that is incorporated into all color cameras to prevent color distortion from near-infrared light. When there is light, the IR-cut filter is on and the camera delivers color video. In dark conditions, the camera removes the filter to make use of near-infrared light to deliver infrared-sensitive black and white video. Infrared or day/night cameras are particularly useful in outdoor environments or situations that restrict the use of artificial light. These situations include discreet and covert surveillance applications.

Minimum illumination/light sensitivity: A network camera’s light sensitivity is often specified in terms of lux, which corresponds to a level of illuminance in which a camera produces an acceptable image.

Type of video compression: There are three main video compression standards in use today. Motion JPEG, MPEG-4 and H.264. H.264 is the latest standard that is expected to become the video standard of choice in the coming years. Without compromising image quality, H.264 can reduce bandwidth and storage requirements by more than 80 percent compared with Motion JPEG and as much as 50 percent more than with the MPEG-4 Part 2 standard.

Enjoy!!!

May 22, 2012 Posted by | Axis, Gadgets, International, IP, IP Surveillance, Switch, video Insight, Wifi a/b/g/n | , , , | Leave a comment

Exchange server 2010 CAS array to MAPI load balance – Detailed

Most of you guys must have experience the scenario when “Outlook connection lost….” even if you have Exchange server 2010 (with Edge, 2 clustered H&C and 2 DAG configured MB) and Outlook 2010 in place. The reason is that, when you are doing a maintenance on one of the H&C, and if the client is connected to that H&C, communication to the MB is lost. The reason for this is that the cluster load balancing on the H&C cluster handler is not in place, even if the cluster name is published in the DNS server.

In Exchange 2007, 5 server roles that performed distinct functions within the Exchange organization. One role in particular – the Client Access server role – introduced a variety of new Web services, including the Availability service, the Auto discover service and Calendar Concierge services.

In Exchange 2010, same 5 server roles exists. However, there are some significant architectural changes and some shift in responsibilities. The most significant change in Exchange 2010, two new services on CAS called the RPC Client Access and Address Book services establish the RPC (Repote Procedure Call) endpoint for MAPI(Messaging Application Programming Interface), NSPI(Name Service Provider Interface) and RFR (Request for Response) client access. This new functionality replaces the RPC endpoints in the Information Store. The RPC endpoint in the Information Store has not been removed in Exchange 2010, but it has been modified to only accept requests from CAS servers. The RPC endpoint for public folder database access remains on the Mailbox server, however, Outlook clients now communicate directly with the RPC Client Access service on the Mailbox Server for public folder database access, and not with the Information Store.

When CAS starts communicating with the Mailbox server, it makes sense to view it as the Client Access server communicating with the Mailbox database via the Mailbox server that hosts the database. This is especially evident in a load-balanced array of Client Access servers and/or where your environment is configured to use Database Availability Groups that are associated with a Client Access server or Client Access server array.

  • In a non-load balanced environment, the mailbox database is associated with only a single Client Access server.
  • In a load-balanced environment, the Mailbox database is associated with the load balanced array of multiple Client Access servers.

By default, before a Client Access array is configured,

  • all databases are associated with a Client Access server in the environment
  • the Outlook clients communicate directly with the Client Access server until the association with the database is updated to be the Client Access array.

In order for the clients to utilize a CAS array

  1. Create a Client Access array with an FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name).
  2. Load balance your CAS servers in a CAS array by whatever method you choose – Both Hardware LB or Windows Network LB are supported load balancers
  3. Add the Client Access servers within the AD site to a load balanced array and in DNS associate the unique FQDN to the Virtual IP of the load-balanced array.
  4. Configure your load balancing array to load balance the MAPI RPC ports – TCP 135, UDP/TCP 6005-65535; or set static ports
  5. Configure the databases to utilize the CAS array… Use the new-clientaccessarray cmdlet to create the CAS array object. Eg: New-ClientAccessArray –Name “Tromso CAS Array” –Fqdn tromso.site.com” –Site “SITEA”

How to Setup!!!..

Goto one of the CAS server where the NLB is ( to read more about New-ClientAccessArray cmdlet, click here )

[1] Check is there are any pre-created CAS Arrays. PS Command : Get-ClientAccessArray

[2] Create new Client Access Array. Run the Cmdlet in EMS New-ClientAccessArray -Fqdn server.contoso.com -Site “Redmond” -Name “server.contoso.com”

[3] Associate databases with this CAS Array –

Use this CMDLet to add mailbox database to CAS array. Add all mailbox databases at once – Get-MailboxDatabase | Set-MailboxDatabase -RPCClientAccessServer “CASNLB.contoso.com”

Now the best part –

Configuring Outlook 2010 using Auto Discover

If you already configured Outlook client, Close the outlook, then goto Control Panel->Mail and change the Server name to the new CAS NLB name

If you are going to use a new outlook configuration, Auto discover will return the new CAS NLB name.

Thats all folks!!! Enjoy!!!

March 28, 2011 Posted by | Active Sync, DAG, ECP, Entourage, EWS, Exchange Management Console, Exchange Management Shell, Exchange server 2010, HTTPS, Hyper-V, IMAP, IP, Mailbox Server Requirements Calculator, Mails, Microsoft, OAB, Office, Office 2010, Office 2011, Office for Mac, Office Professional Plus, Outlook, Outlook Webapps, OWA, POP3, Protocols, Public Folder, Software, TCP, Transport architecture | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Etisalat new HSPA + Wifi Router

New HSPA + Wifi Router Model number 3G21WE from Etisalat….Its a 3G Modem Router with Wireless N technology, 4Ethernet Port and 2 USB port for File/Print sharing. This supports the downlink speed upto 21Mbps and an uplink speed upto 5.76Mpbs. Purpose for this is to use remote internet access accross UAE. Cool product..

What is HSPA?

HSPA supports increased peak data rates of up to 14 Mbit/s in the downlink and 5.8 Mbit/s in the uplink. It also reduces latency and provides up to five times more system capacity in the downlink and up to twice as much system capacity in the uplink, reducing the production cost per bit compared to original WCDMA protocols. HSPA increases peak data rates and capacity in several ways:

  • Shared-channel transmission, which results in efficient use of available code and power resources in WCDMA
  • A shorter Transmission Time Interval (TTI), which reduces round-trip time and improves the tracking of fast channel variations
  • Link adaptation, which maximizes channel usage and enables the base station to operate close to maximum cell power
  • Fast scheduling, which prioritizes users with the most favorable channel conditions
  • Fast retransmission and soft-combining, which further increase capacity
  • 16QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation), which yields higher bit-rates

HSPA has been commercially deployed by over 200 operators in more than 80 countries.

July 13, 2010 Posted by | Etisalat, Gadgets, HSPA, IP, Protocols, Router, Switch, UAE, Wifi a/b/g/n | , , , , | Leave a comment

Dell San Management – How to change a volume from clustered group to nonclustered group

Dell MD300i, if you want to change the Volume, which is already on a clustered group and want to use the same volume to a non-clustered group,

Go to San Management, click on the volume, and then click change

another popup window will come, select the Non clustered option and click ok

That’s it

June 26, 2010 Posted by | DELL, IP, iSCSI, SAN | , , , , | Leave a comment

Sender Policy Framework…need to know about how to protect the Mail spam

If you have not already done so, I highly recommend you create an SPF record for your domain as this will make it much more difficult for spammers to forge your domain in order to spam domains in other organizations.

Sender Policy Framework..WikiPedia Definition

Creating your own SPF record is a relatively simple process, Microsoft even provides a web-based GUI wizard that will help you do this.. Domain holders need to complete an inventory and publish all IP addresses of their outbound email servers in the DNS zone file. This is an administrative step that requires no changes to an organizations email or DNS software. Even if your domain has no outbound email servers, you can help protect your domain from spoofing by publishing an SPF record in the DNS that states this. Microsoft Safety Home Page click here

Implementation Tips for the Sender ID Framework—Creating Your SPF Record..Click here

Sender ID Overview Click here

June 13, 2010 Posted by | Edge Server, Exchange Server 2007, Exchange server 2010, Forefront, Internet Information Services (IIS), IP, IP Block List, Microsoft, Sender Policy Framework, Software, Threat Management Gateway | , , , , | Leave a comment

Exchange server 2007 to 2010 Live migration!!!! Live blog!!! Live Platform…real time scenario!!!

Please find on my blog, one page dedicated to this task…you can see it on my blog top page… or click here

             TO                                          

 MIGRATION…Started on June 8, 2010 ….Today 20th of June..all the objects has been replicated to Exchange 2010..Now the decommissioning starts..Finish too

June 10, 2010 Posted by | Active Sync, Calendar, DAG, DELL, ECP, Edge Server, EWS, Exchange Management Console, Exchange Management Shell, Exchange Pre-Deployment Analyzer, Exchange Server 2007, Exchange server 2010, Exchange Server Profile Analyzer, Facebook, Firewall, Forefront, HTTP, HTTPS, IMAP, Internet Information Services (IIS), iOS4, IP, IP Block List, iPhone, iSCSI, Linkedin, Log Parser, Mailbox Server Requirements Calculator, MailTips, Microsoft, OAB, Office, Office 2010, Office 2011, Office for Mac, Outlook, Outlook Webapps, OWA, Phone, POP3, Protocols, Public Folder, Remote Connectivity Analyzer, SAN, SAN Certificate, Sender Policy Framework, Social Connectors, Software, Threat Management Gateway, Transport architecture, Twitter, Windows 7 phone, Windows Server 2008 R2 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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