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Who Can Federate Tool: Check which Outlook contacts have Microsoft Lync

Who can Federate with Microsoft Lync? Check it out…Matt Landis wrote a beautiful blog with tool.

Click here to check … Thanks Matt

 

 

May 26, 2014 Posted by | Exchange Online, Lync, Lync Online, Microsoft, Office 365, Skype, Software | , , | Leave a comment

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 – Mail flow

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013, mail flow occurs through the transport pipeline. The transport pipeline is a collection of services, connections, components, and queues that work together to route all messages to the categorizer in the Transport service on a Mailbox server inside the organization.

The transport pipeline consists of the following services:

  • Front End Transport service   This service runs on all Client Access servers and acts as a stateless proxy for all inbound and outbound external SMTP traffic for the Exchange 2013 organization. The Front End Transport service doesn’t inspect message content, but it can filter messages based on connections, domains, senders, and recipients. The Front End Transport service only communicates with the Transport service on a Mailbox server, and doesn’t queue any messages locally.
  • Transport service   This service runs on all Mailbox servers and is virtually identical to the Hub Transport server role in previous versions of Exchange. The Transport service handles all SMTP mail flow for the organization, performs message categorization, and performs message content inspection. Unlike previous versions of Exchange, the Transport service never communicates directly with mailbox databases. That task is now handled by the Mailbox Transport service. The Transport service routes messages between the Mailbox Transport service, the Transport service, and the Front End Transport service.
  • Mailbox Transport service   This service runs on all Mailbox servers and consists of two separate services: the Mailbox Transport Submission service and Mailbox Transport Delivery service. The Mailbox Transport Delivery service receives SMTP messages from the Transport service on the local Mailbox server or on other Mailbox servers, and connects to the local mailbox database using an Exchange remote procedure call (RPC) to deliver the message. The Mailbox Transport Submission service connects to the local mailbox database using RPC to retrieve messages, and submits the messages over SMTP to the Transport service on the local Mailbox server, or on other Mailbox servers. The Mailbox Transport Submission service has access to the same routing topology information as the Transport service. Like the Front End Transport service, the Mailbox Transport service also doesn’t queue any messages locally.

Messages from outside the organization enter the transport pipeline through a Receive connector in the Front End Transport service on a Client Access server and are then routed to the Transport service on a Mailbox server.

Messages inside the organization enter the Transport service on a Mailbox server in one of the following ways:

  • Through a Receive connector.
  • From the Pickup directory or the Replay directory.
  • From the Mailbox Transport service.
  • Through agent submission.

The following figure shows the relationships among the components in the Exchange 2013 transport pipeline.

Transport pipeline overview diagram

Every message that’s sent or received in an Exchange 2013 organization must be categorized in the Transport service on a Mailbox server before it can be routed and delivered. After a message has been categorized, it’s put in a delivery queue for delivery to the destination mailbox database, the destination database availability group (DAG), Active Directory site, or Active Directory forest, or to the destination domain outside the organization.

The Transport service on a Mailbox server consists of the following components and processes:

    • SMTP Receive   When messages are received by the Transport service, message content inspection is performed, transport rules are applied, and anti-spam and anti-malware inspection is performed if they are enabled. The SMTP session has a series of events that work together in a specific order to validate the contents of a message before it’s accepted. After a message has passed completely through SMTP Receive and isn’t rejected by receive events, or by an anti-spam and anti-malware agent, it’s put in the Submission queue.
    • Submission   Submission is the process of putting messages into the Submission queue. The categorizer picks up one message at a time for categorization. Submission happens in three ways:
      • Through an SMTP Receive connector.
      • Through the Pickup directory or the Replay directory. These directories exist on the Mailbox server. Correctly formatted message files that are copied into the Pickup directory or the Replay directory are put directly into the Submission queue.
      • Through a transport agent.
    • Categorizer   The categorizer picks up one message at a time from the Submission queue. The categorizer completes the following steps:
      • Recipient resolution, which includes top-level addressing, expansion, and bifurcation.
      • Routing resolution.
      • Content conversion.

      Additionally, mail flow rules that are defined by the organization are applied. After messages have been categorized, they’re put into a delivery queue that’s based on the destination of the message. Messages are queued by the destination mailbox database, DAG, Active Directory site, Active Directory forest or external domain.

    • SMTP Send   How messages are routed from the Transport service depends on the location of the message recipients relative to the Mailbox server where categorization occurred. The message could be routed to the Mailbox Transport service on the same Mailbox server, the Mailbox Transport service on a different Mailbox server that’s part of the same DAG, the Transport service on a Mailbox server in a different DAG, Active Directory site, or Active Directory forest, or to the Front End Transport service on a Client Access server for delivery to the Internet.

Message Size Limits..Click here to know more

Configure Mail Flow and Client Access…Click here to know more

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Exchange Online, Exchange server 2013, Mails, Microsoft, Software | , | Leave a comment

Nokia Lumia 920 – The Phone that sets the standard

  • 8.7 megapixels Camera sensor (main camera resolution)
  • Nokia PureView Camera
  • 4.5 ” Display size
  • Snapdragon™ S4 Processor name
  • 10 h Talk time (3G)
  • 400 h Standby time (3G)
  • 67 h Maximum music playback time

Operating system and software

The Nokia Lumia 920 runs the Windows Phone 8 operating system. As with other Lumia devices, the 920 includes Nokia-exclusive apps, like Nokia City Lens, an augmented reality software that gives dynamic information about users’ surroundings. Click here for Specifications.

Inductive charging

The phone can be recharged either physically or inductively using the Qi technology. Rather than requiring the use of a physical connection to the phone, this requires the phone to be placed upon a charging pad which, unlike a physical connector, hinders use of the phone while charging. The charging pad requires a separate power supply.

Processors, memory, and storage

The Lumia 920 has a 1.5 GHz dual-core Qualcomm Krait, and a Qualcomm Adreno 225 GPU, and has 1 GB of system RAM

Nokia Lumia 920 comes with an internal storage capacity of 32 GB. Although Windows Phone 8 supports storage expansion using microSD cards, Lumia 920 does not support them.

Screen

The Lumia 920 has a 4.5-inch curved glass display running at WXGA (1280 × 768) resolution with an aspect ratio of 15:9 using enhanced IPS screen technology which Nokia calls “PureMotion HD+”. It has less than 9 ms average transition times, where conventional IPS LCDs have an average of 23 ms, which reduces motion blur.

Camera

The Lumia 920 has Nokia’s PureView technology on the rear camera, which Nokia claims to be the best currently available on any smartphone, capturing “five to 10 times more light than competitor devices” via a “floating lens technology that surpasses the optical image stabilization system of most digital SLRs.

Click here for accessories list.

 

October 6, 2012 Posted by | Exchange Online, Lumia 920, Lync Online, Microsoft, Nokia, Office 2010, Office 365, Office for Mac, Phone, Software, Windows phone, Windows Phone 8 | , , , , | Leave a comment

Exchange Server “2013” Preview is out

Exchange 2013 preview release will subject to change when it reaches to RTM. Installing Exchange 2013 Preview is not for production environment.

Exchange 2013 preview is for simplicity of scale, hardware utilization, and failure isolation. With Exchange 2013 Preview, they reduced the number of server roles to two:

  1. the Client Access server role
  2. the Mailbox server role.

The Mailbox server includes all the traditional server components found in Exchange 2010

  • the Client Access protocols
  • Hub Transport service
  • Mailbox databases, and Unified Messaging.

The Mailbox server handles all activity for a given mailbox. The Client Access server provides authentication, redirection, and proxy services.

The Client Access server itself doesn’t do any data rendering. It is a thin and stateless server. There is never anything queued or stored on the Client Access server.

The Client Access server offers all the usual client access protocols: HTTP, POP and IMAP, and SMTP.

Managed Store works with the Microsoft Exchange Replication service to manage mailbox databases, which continues to use Extensible Storage Engine (ESE) as the database engine. Exchange 2013 Preview includes significant changes to the mailbox database schema that provide many optimizations over previous versions of Exchange. In addition to these changes, the Microsoft Exchange Replication service is responsible for all service availability related to Mailbox servers. The architectural changes enable faster database failover and better physical disk failure handling.

The Managed Store is also integrated with the FAST search engine (the same search engine used by SharePoint 2013 Preview) to provide more robust indexing and searching.

No more Exchange Management Console (EMC) Administration is now performed using the new web-based Exchange Administration Center and the Exchange Management Shell (3.0)

All certificate management is performed on the Client Access server. The Mailbox server has a self-signed certificate installed by default. The Client Access server automatically trusts the self-signed certificate on the Exchange 2013 Preview Mailbox server, so clients will not receive warnings about a self-signed certificate not being trusted provided that the Exchange 2013 Preview Client Access server has a non-self-signed certificate from either a Windows certificate authority (CA) or a trusted third party.

Exchange 2013 Preview offers greater integration with SharePoint 2013 Preview and Lync 2013 Preview. Benefits of this enhanced integration include:

  • Users collaborate more effectively by using site mailboxes.
  • Lync Server 2013 Preview can archive content in Exchange 2013 Preview and use Exchange 2013 Preview as a contact store.
  • Discovery Managers can perform In-Place eDiscovery and Hold searches across SharePoint 2013 Preview, Exchange 2013 Preview, and Lync 2013 Preview data.
  • Oauth authentication allows partner applications to authenticate as a service or impersonate users where required.

Public folders in Exchange 2013 Preview now take advantage of the existing high availability and storage technologies of the mailbox store. The public folder architecture uses specially designed mailboxes to store both the hierarchy and the public folder content. This new design also means that there is no longer a public folder database. Public folder replication now uses the continuous replication model. High availability for the hierarchy and content mailboxes is provided by the DAG. With this design, we’re moving away from a multi-master replication model to a single-master replication model.

Exchange 2013 Preview continues to make use of the database availability group (DAG) platform introduced in Exchange 2010 for both high availability and site resilience. Exchange 2013 Preview also includes enhancements to the DAG platform that improve manageability and reduce costs. These features include:

  • Managed availability.
  • Managed Store.
  • Automatic configuration and management of DAG networks.
  • Management via the Exchange Administration Center.
  • Enhancements to DAG-related cmdlets to introduce new scenarios.

PRE-REQUISITES

INSTALLATION TYPE

  • Install Exchange 2013 Using the Setup Wizard, Click here
  • Install Exchange 2013 in Unattended Mode, Click here

July 23, 2012 Posted by | Exchange Online, Exchange server 2013, Microsoft, Software | , , | Leave a comment

Remote Connectivity Analyzer now supports O365 – Tabbed!!!

Microsoft Exchange Remote Connectivity analyzer is now the Microsoft Remote  Connectivity Analyzer

The future direction for this tool is to incorporate more products as we have done with Office 365.

Thus dropping “Exchange” from the name made sense.

Tabbed user-interface to support multiple products and Office 365. Office 365 Single sign-on validation.  This test allows you to validate identity federated scenarios with Office 365.  Specifically, this new test targets the “Basic Authentication” federated scenario where a client sends credentials to Office 365 which in turn validates them against the on-premises ADFS server.

Below is the test result of a SSO from RCA.

Enjoy!!!

 

March 18, 2012 Posted by | Active Sync, ADFS, Cloud, Cloud Computing, DIR Sync, Exchange Online, Exchange server 2010, Microsoft, Office 365, Remote Connectivity Analyzer, Software | , | 1 Comment

Office 365 – 22 new markets – 64 geographies – with more to come!

Office 365 to another 22 new markets to grow our global footprint to 64 geographies  – with more to come!

Microsoft has reduced Office 365 for enterprise plans by up to 20%.

Enjoy!!!

March 18, 2012 Posted by | Cloud, Cloud Computing, Exchange Online, FOPE, Licensing cloud services, Lync Online, Microsoft, Office, Office 365, Office Professional Plus, Sharepoint Online, Software | , | Leave a comment

Office 365 System Requirements – Client side

If you ever look at all the migration that we do, we have to completed the biggest challenge; clients has been getting the system requirements ready for Office 365.

 Click here to know more from my dedicated blog for O365 users.

Enjoy!!!

March 18, 2012 Posted by | Active Sync, ADFS, Cloud Computing, DIR Sync, Exchange Online, Exchange server 2010, FOPE, Licensing cloud services, Lync Online, Microsoft, Microsoft Azure, Office, Office 2010, Office 365, Office Professional Plus, Outlook, Sharepoint Online, Software | , | 5 Comments

Office 365 limitations & requirements – What user should know?

This page has been moved..please click here

March 17, 2012 Posted by | Cloud Computing, Exchange Online, Microsoft, Office, Office 365, Software | , , | Leave a comment

Office 365 – Cloud configuration – Step by step

In my previous post…ADFS…Active Directory Federation Service i was talking about the ADFS architecture and promise for the deployment or migration to O365 from Microsoft.

Here i’m dedicating a page for Office 365 live migration …Click here to divert to the page

Enjoy..!!!

March 13, 2012 Posted by | ADFS, Cloud Computing, DIR Sync, Exchange Online, Exchange server 2010, FOPE, Internet Information Services (IIS), Licensing cloud services, Lync Online, Microsoft, Office, Office 2010, Office 365, Office Professional Plus, Power Shell, Sharepoint Online, Software | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ADFS…Active Directory Federation Service

This page has been moved to a dedicated page for Office 365 users..click here

February 10, 2012 Posted by | ADFS, Cloud Computing, DIR Sync, Exchange Online, FOPE, Lync Online, Microsoft, Office 365, Office Professional Plus, Sharepoint Online, Software, Windows phone | , , , | 1 Comment

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